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Photography - A Poor Man's GuidePhotography - A Poor Man's GuideTutorial

twoduytwoduy4 vuotta sitten
Final Photo Preview - Kamisama Hestia
http://i.imgur.com/clP45rF.jpg
When I posted my fairy album blog/28353&... earlier, quite a lot of people asked me how I shoot those photos with just an iPhone. So this is a step by step guide on how I did it. All you need is a smart phone with a decent built-in camera and some common household items!

Figure: Hestia by Kotobukiya. Photos taken with iPhone 6S plus.


http://i.imgur.com/OT5Y9CX.jpg
Natural light is your best friend. But you should not use direct sunlight for your photography - unless it is your artistic intention. Direct sunlight is very harsh and will cast hard shadows all over the subject.

Also, unless you are taking pictures during sunrise or sunset, the Sun will always be shining down from an angle, creating all kind of annoying funky shadowy shapes.



http://i.imgur.com/jjqsK1b.jpg

Sunlight is best when used indirectly. One the left we have Hestia evenly lit using natural light, but indirectly (by indirect I meant the light has bounced off other surfaces before hitting the subject - more on this below). This light is softer, more pleasant on the eye and does not create hard shadows.

On the right, Hestia is lit by the same light source, but this time with a smooth white background. The background is just a piece of paper taped to the wall, it serves two purposes: 1. to reflect additional light and 2. to create a continuous uninterrupted background - for aesthetic.



http://i.imgur.com/vfyDahD.jpg

A poor man's studio setup - daylight version. No fancy lightning equipment or DSLR with tripod required, all we need are the following:
-Natural light source from a window.
-A piece of paper and some tape to be the background for the figure. It doesn't have to be white, but white happens to be best for lighting.
-A mirror to act as a reflector, facing toward the light source. If you don't have a portable mirror then a flat white board or any kind of large reflective surface will work.

With this setup and a decent phone camera, your photography is 90% complete already. The next 10% is just post-processing. If you don't care about post processing you can skip the next 4 points.

If you somehow don't have a window because you are a basement dweller or maybe exposure to sunlight is deadly to you, don't worry. I also cover a night time studio setup for the second half of this tutorial.



http://i.imgur.com/QNkxtE6.jpg

Camera phone are tricky. Notice in this image, all the backgrounds are slightly different in color, even though they have the same light source, taken in the same location, same time with the same phone.

To speak in layman's terms, this happens because when you take a picture, your phone sensor will measure the light and automatically try to compensate the color in order for the result to be most "neutral". Unfortunately what the software decides to be neutral is not always the same as what we perceive as neutral with the human eye.

The reason why I pick Hestia for this demonstration is because her color is rather neutral, making her easier to photograph than the more colorful figures.



http://i.imgur.com/towsz8K.jpg

Another example of the automatic color management by your phone camera. On the left is one taken with the screen light of my iMac at 25%, on the right is the same photo but the screen light is 5% only. Notice how much of a drastic difference it makes in the lighting.

As a mostly neutral color figure, Hestia makes an ideal sample to follow when you adjust color in post processing. Just match the background of whatever figures you are trying to photograph to the same tone and brightness as in Hestia's photo and they will turn out just fine.



http://i.imgur.com/WfRmDnb.jpg

Post processing makes a big difference. You don't need to have Adobe Photoshop or Light Room to do this. There are plenty of free photo editing apps available to use, we are not trying to create professional level prints here.

To make it simple I break the post processing workflow down to 3 steps as you can see in this chart. Any basic photo editing software would have these options:
1. Adjust Brightness / Contrast: A rule of thumb is when you see details have been lost in white area (like Hestia's butt blending into the background), then your picture is too bright. Vice versa, if you start to lose details in the black areas then your picture is too dark.
2. Adjust Color Saturation: Keep saturation in moderation, try to match the color as close as possible to what you actually see with your own eyes.
3.Adjust Color Temperature: "Warm" and "Cool" are just fancy ways of saying if the photo has too much yellow light or too much blue light. Try to find the right balance.



http://i.imgur.com/U0TiyWc.gif

Post processing in action. A gif animation to show the simple 3 steps post processing.



http://i.imgur.com/oYVMPZ8.jpg


http://i.imgur.com/i1EBOOf.jpg


http://i.imgur.com/Vc7w0nM.jpg


http://i.imgur.com/3kUMZYl.jpg

Some final Hestia photos for your viewing pleasure.



http://i.imgur.com/gO9M2yg.jpg

Next, a quick tutorial for low light photography. Your phone camera flash creates very harsh shadows - similar to direct sunlight, only uglier. Never use flash.



http://i.imgur.com/iOTbSce.jpg

Instead, use a diffused light source for softer shadows. Don't have one of these? No worries!



http://i.imgur.com/xbJTlOu.jpg

DIY diffused lighting. Just cut up some papers and tape them to your light sources, could not be more simple.



http://i.imgur.com/WmpEidJ.jpg

A little bit more complicated than the day time version, because we don't have a large light source, we will be using two lights and a reflector (mirror).

Note: it is important that the fill light is not as bright as the main light. My fill light is actually brighter, which created some undesirable shadows in the final photos.



http://i.imgur.com/FdBTO6b.jpg

Poor man's lighting in action.
Left: Only main light is used. Lighting is very uneven.
Middle: Main light + fill light without the paper tape to diffuse the light. Lots of light but very hard shadows also.
Right: Main light + diffused fill light. Now this is acceptable



http://i.imgur.com/OF8pcbI.jpg

Low light photography: after post processing. Pretty decent! Not as good as the day light version of course.

As mentioned above, it is important that the fill light is not as bright as the main light. My fill light is actually brighter, which created some undesirable shadows in the final photos.



http://i.imgur.com/Gm684Wr.jpg

Thank you for reading! Have fun photographing your figures!
7,407 osumaa • 0 suosikki14 kommenttia

kommenttia14

I saw this at imgur just a few days ago! Oh thank goodness it's here too cause imgur is hell honestly (the loading kills me every time).

Thank you for sharing this great tips!
4 vuotta sitten
Great guide, truly enjoyed reading it. I'm eager to try this out with my smartphone =3
4 vuotta sitten
Thanks for the guide. I'm not too into photography, but it was nonetheless very informative. Thanks for sharing! :D
4 vuotta sitten
Taking notes for a future blog post I'm planning to do down the line. Thanks a lot for sharing :D
4 vuotta sitten
thank you for sharing tips and tricks for lighting
4 vuotta sitten
Very helpful! I am just getting into figure photography so this post is a pure blessing.
4 vuotta sitten
This was super informative! Thanks for sharing!
4 vuotta sitten
Chloe-tsundere4 vuotta sitten#9642929I got a dslr camera but it was still a great read and i can learn from it neverthless since im just starting and that white paper and mirror seem to solve most of my problems actually.
Cause it is often too bright or too dark and doesnt turn out great and I got a background set but it never looks entirely satisfying for figures.. Unless i do close ups but not awhole as you can see the black and blue parts not solely blue or black (hard to explain)
Anyways thanks


Glad you find this post useful! I hope many people will be able to use this techniques to improve their photography without the need for expensive equipment.
4 vuotta sitten
solluxcaptor4 vuotta sitten#9641384Amazing tutorial, thank you so much!! It's really helpful to see a simpler tutorial but still with stunning results, a lot of these photo tutorials are just too heavy set-up or have too much expensive equipment for me, but this one is so nice and simple I will definitely give it a try!

Thanks! Looking forward to seeing your pictures!
4 vuotta sitten
Chloe-tsundere The louise otaku
I got a dslr camera but it was still a great read and i can learn from it neverthless since im just starting and that white paper and mirror seem to solve most of my problems actually.
Cause it is often too bright or too dark and doesnt turn out great and I got a background set but it never looks entirely satisfying for figures.. Unless i do close ups but not awhole as you can see the black and blue parts not solely blue or black (hard to explain)

Anyways thanks
4 vuotta sitten