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NemsEngelAceSasuNemsEngelAceSasu2 vuotta sitten
Hello mfc.

I finally got around to buy some pastel chalk for shading. I'm kinda new so I don't want to mess up my previous paint with a poor normal paint. However if I make it to powder and try to add some shading with it, it doesn't give the effect I want. It kinda doesn't do anything at all. What am I doing wrong?
2,396 osumaa • 0 suosikki6 kommenttia

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I used pastels to shade/highlight my last garage kit...and it worked great for me, but I had to put a layer of matte finish on before as that gave the powder something to adhere to. It also darkens naturally when you re-coat it with the matte sealant also, so keep that in mind (as if you don't coat it last it can be wiped off over time, etc...).

Here are a few shots of the pants before, after adding black for shading and white for highlights, and then the final spray of sealant. You can see how it does change it up, but they are a more subtle effect for sure:

https://static.myfigurecollection.net/image/Stacycmc1517107255.jpeg
https://static.myfigurecollection.net/image/Stacycmc1517107257.jpeghttps://static.myfigurecollection.net/image/Stacycmc1517107261.jpeg
https://static.myfigurecollection.net/image/Stacycmc1517107277.jpeg

Like I mentioned the initial pic and final pic are very subtle, and before the sealant was applied over the pastels, it looked REALLY light and chalky.

If you are not getting a significant enough effect with your pastels though, you may have to do a few coats. That means you have to seal the coats in between applications though, as there is a point where additional applications will not adhere so you'll need to seal those layers in with the matte spray, that keeps the bottom layers from coming off as you try to apply more and gives you another textured surface for additional applications to stick to. As you layer it on, seal and layer, etc... (just don't spray too much sealant or you can cause flaking from too heavy / too many layers), the effect will gradually increase.

Hope that helps...and good luck!! OH...if pastels don't work too, there is also a shading paint. It's kind of like watered down paint that you brush on. I've never used it though, but have seen several modelers use it.
2 vuotta sitten
Not sure how to help you, but it reminded me of sailormatlac's tutorial: BLOG #31975
2 vuotta sitten
NemsEngelAceSasu2 vuotta sitten#34451245Thank you. Yeah I assumed I'm might just too impatient. What I wanna shade is a custom nendo hair, it's sealed with mate finish already. But the pad is to big to fit. I'll just have to add a lot I guess. I'm just worried that upon adding more I'll take it away also. :/

If you wanna add, without accidentally taking off, I noticed dabbing it onto the surface (that actually grips) helps allot. If there's too much on a spot you can brush it away with clean brush. If it really was too much though, and you can't get it off with the brush, you gotta wash it off.
Small brush, not too much chalk, and then carefully dabbing onto the spots, and afterwards doing a very gentle brushing to smooth it out.
(I also used my little finger to add blush to my Izuku nendoroid, and that worked a treat.)
2 vuotta sitten
Iskana2 vuotta sitten#34450401I think, and this is just what I think.
The reason may be that the chalk has nothing to stick to.
The surface of most figures is sealed, so it doesn't have the necessary surface grip for it to stay on.
Another reason may also be that since it's chalk, it just seems to take forever to build up, since it just takes small amounts of chalk at a time.
If the surface is "slick" it's probably not able to stick. If the surface is slightly more rough, it may just may take more layers.
Imuya2 vuotta sitten#34450568The surface does need to be sealed first, I do it with my garage kits.
It takes layers upon layers upon layers using a brush to show any effect.
If you want thicker layers faster you can use a cotton bud. Be warned though this can apply it too heavily and leave streaking if not done carefully (tap the bud after you've picked up the powder to get the excess off)
I found that worked wonders for shading my Iowa but not very well for super pale figures so I used a brush and built it up.
Hope that helps.
Edit: oh forgot to add, if the surface is shiny it may not stick as it means they've used a semi gloss/gloss coat which is too smooth to grip a lot of the time. Surfaces like Nendoroid faces take it lovely though.



Thank you. Yeah I assumed I'm might just too impatient. What I wanna shade is a custom nendo hair, it's sealed with mate finish already. But the pad is to big to fit. I'll just have to add a lot I guess. I'm just worried that upon adding more I'll take it away also. :/
2 vuotta sitten
The surface does need to be sealed first, I do it with my garage kits.
It takes layers upon layers upon layers using a brush to show any effect.
If you want thicker layers faster you can use a cotton bud. Be warned though this can apply it too heavily and leave streaking if not done carefully (tap the bud after you've picked up the powder to get the excess off)
I found that worked wonders for shading my Iowa but not very well for super pale figures so I used a brush and built it up.

Hope that helps.

Edit: oh forgot to add, if the surface is shiny it may not stick as it means they've used a semi gloss/gloss coat which is too smooth to grip a lot of the time. Surfaces like Nendoroid faces take it lovely though.
2 vuotta sitten
I think, and this is just what I think.

The reason may be that the chalk has nothing to stick to.

The surface of most figures is sealed, so it doesn't have the necessary surface grip for it to stay on.

Another reason may also be that since it's chalk, it just seems to take forever to build up, since it just takes small amounts of chalk at a time.

If the surface is "slick" it's probably not able to stick. If the surface is slightly more rough, it may just may take more layers.
2 vuotta sitten
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